BHUTAN (5 N 6 D)

HASIMARA TO HASHARA

PHUENTSHOLING 1 NIGHT

THINPU 2 NIGHT

PARO 2 NIGHJT

delicious food, Comfortable Lodging in hotel, Sightseeing by car

JUST 12,900/-

Kingdom of Bhutan

འབྲུག་རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ (Dzongkha)
Druk Gyal Khap
Anthem: Druk tsendhen
The Thunder Dragon Kingdom

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A map of the world, centred on South Asia, highlighting Bhutan
A map of east-central Asia, highlighting Bhutan
Capital
and largest city
Thimphu
27°28.0′N89°38.5′E
Official languagesDzongkha
ReligionBuddhism
Hinduism
DemonymBhutanese
GovernmentUnitary parliamentaryconstitutional monarchy
• King
Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck
Dasho Tshering Wangchuk (chief advisor)
LegislatureParliament
National Council
National Assembly
Formation
• Unification of Bhutan
1616–1634
17 December 1907
8 August 1949
21 September 1971
18 July 2008
Area
• Total
38,394 km2(14,824 sq mi)[1][2](133rd)
• Water (%)
1.1
Population
• 2016 estimate
797,765[3] (165th)
• 2005a census
634,982[4]
• Density
19.3/km2 (50.0/sq mi) (196th)
GDP (PPP)2018 estimate
• Total
$8.010 billion[5]
• Per capita
$9,805[5] (115th)
GDP (nominal)2018 estimate
• Total
$2.610 billion[5]
• Per capita
$3,197[5] (130th)
Gini (2012)38.7[6]
medium
HDI (2015)Increase 0.607[7]
medium · 132nd
CurrencyNgultrum (BTN)
Time zoneBTT (UTC+6)
• Summer (DST)
not observed (UTC+6)
Drives on theleft
Calling code+975
ISO 3166 codeBT
Internet TLD.bt
  1. The population of Bhutan had been estimated based on the reported figure of about 1 million in the 1970s when the country had joined the United Nations and precise statistics were lacking.[8] Thus, using the annual increase rate of 2–3%, the most population estimates were around 2 million in the year 2000. A national census was carried out in 2005 and it turned out that the population was 672,425. Consequently, United Nations Population Division reduced its estimation of the country’s population in the 2006 revision[9] for the whole period from 1950 to 2050.

Bhutan (/bˈtɑːn/; འབྲུག་ཡུལ་ Druk Yul), officially the Kingdom of Bhutan (འབྲུག་རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ Druk Gyal Khap),[10] is a landlocked country in South Asia. Located in the Eastern Himalayas, it is bordered by Tibet Autonomous Region of China in the north, the Sikkim state of India and the Chumbi Valley of Tibet in the west, the Arunachal Pradesh state of India in the east, and the states of Assam and West Bengal in the south. Bhutan is geopolitically in South Asia and is the region’s second least populous nation after the MaldivesThimphu is its capital and largest city, while Phuntsholing is its financial center.

The independence of Bhutan has endured for centuries and it has never been colonized in its history. Situated on the ancient Silk Roadbetween Tibet, the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, the Bhutanese state developed a distinct national identity based on Buddhism. Headed by a spiritual leader known as the Zhabdrung Rinpoche, the territory was composed of many fiefdoms and governed as a Buddhist theocracy. Following a civil war in the 19th century, the House of Wangchuck reunited the country and established relations with the British Empire. Bhutan fostered a strategic partnership with India during the rise of Chinese communism and has a disputed border with the People’s Republic of China. In 2008, it transitioned from an absolute monarchy to a constitutional monarchy and held the first election to the National Assembly of Bhutan. The National Assembly of Bhutan is part of the bicameral parliament of the Bhutanese democracy.[11]

The country’s landscape ranges from lush subtropical plains in the south to the sub-alpine Himalayan mountains in the north, where there are peaks in excess of 7,000 metres (23,000 ft). The highest mountain in Bhutan is the Gangkhar Puensum, which is also a strong candidate for the highest unclimbed mountain in the world. There is also diverse wildlife in Bhutan.